20170116

Swimmer

Title: Pool (Diptych)
Medium: Oil on Aluminium Plate
Size: 93cm x 226cm
Year: 2016

Title: Undercurrent
Medium: Oil on Aluminium Plate
Size: 93cm x 113cm
Year: 2016


Title: Float
Medium: Oil on Aluminium Plate
Size: 113cm x 93cm
Year: 2016


Title: Leaks
Medium: Oil on Aluminium Plate
Size: 113cm x 93cm
Year: 2016

Title: Swimmer
Medium: Oil on Aluminium Plate
Size: 113cm x 93cm
Year: 2016


Title: Here or there
Medium: Oil on Aluminium Plate
Size: 75cm x 152.5cm
Year: 2016


Title: There or here
Medium: Oil on Aluminium Plate
Size: 75cm x 152.5cm
Year: 2016



Title: Golden skin (A-J)
Medium: Oil on Brass Plates
Size: 101.7cm x 244.2cm
Year: 2016


Title: 1 song
Medium: Piano installation
Size: 114cm x 144cm x 61cm
Year: 2016



20160531

Recycle



Statement
I collect fragments. Through reconstructing the fragments, I reveal the unseen context.

I made 3 sets of works: Painting, sculpture installation and a DIY workshop. These 3 sets of works share the same theme and subject: To recycle the broken sculptures. To me the broken sculptures represented the classic academic art training.

Plaster sculpture has been a study tool at local art schools.  I found plenty of abandoned broken plaster sculptures in the art studio of my school. From the way the plaster sculptures had been treated, I wondered what is their value today, presented to students, teachers and viewers. As a lecturer cum artist, I have critical views on art education practice in Malaysia. Working with this new medium and method helps me to express and discuss my concerns.

Generally, I find the classic academic practice seem less relevant today. The mainstream western art education that I had before in UK focus on the personal development about individual, basically you make art that relevant to your self, your life. As an artist who benefit from academic art training, I see the value in it. Therefore, I have the idea to “Recycle” the broken sculpture, to explore and demonstrate the possible extension of classic academic art training under today’s context.


                                                                                            

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The paintings on aluminium:
Title: Michelangelo Slave
Medium: Oil on Aluminium Plate
Size: 114cm x 93cm
Year: 2016

Title: Venus de Milo
Medium: Oil and Gold leaf on Aluminium Plate
Size: 114cm x 93cm
Year: 2016

Title: Belvedere Torso
Medium: Oil and Gold leaf on Aluminium Plate
Size: 114cm x 93cm
Year: 2016

I imitate 3 classic statues by a deconstructed classic painting technique; I expose the grid lines, geometry forms, contours, markings, and anatomy, basically the process of painting but surface. 

I always find the different processes of painting are more interesting than the outcome, along the process you see different layers, different intentions, decisions and even mistakes. But these all end up covered by the colour layers, only the artist knows what's hidden underneath.

Through aluminium I get to examination the function of "Undo" in computer language under a physical format, which one can keep revisit the layer before, change or delete any information entirely. Thus, I invite the viewer to witness my painting progress, a new viewing experience that evolves from the classic.


                                                  

Progress of Michelangelo Slave

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DIY workshop: 
Title: Mould it yourself
Medium: Found object installation with broken plaster sculpture, baking equipment, laptop, cookies mould
Size: Dimension variable
Year: 2016

Do it yourself, this is the way of learning nowadays.

I ask the participant to recycle the broken plaster sculptures, by breaking everything into smashes, mixing with different ingredients, put in to different mould and bake new sets of plaster model themselves. They will bring home with what they made at the end. The participant may learn from the computer, where I have selected certain instructions from Internet as their references.

This is what I find the practice of art education now. Students are encouraged to self- explore, to break the rules. And there are not much rules to learn anymore from the school. Especially when everyone get all the sources through Internet, is there really a need to go to the art school? I wonder.  Especially when everyone is taking the same syllabus, having same perception about art, isn’t everyone’s mindset end up the same? Or they may be the old wine in new bottle.

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The sculpture installation:
Title: Way Out
Medium: Site- specific installation with found broken plaster sculptures, used brushes, plants
Size: Dimension variable
Year: 2016

There are 2 groups of broken sculptures. I line up the first group at the first floor of the gallery toward the balcony’s exit, and the second group were fallen in to the garden, some ended up as smashes, some get to attached to the nature with plants growing in it. These plants consist of different flavours that Malaysian may familiar with, such as: Banana, Papaya, Hibiscus, Cilli Padi, Pandan, Lime, and Croton. 

It seem they are rejected by the current system, and when you walk out, to connect to the different geographies or communities, it may grow again. There are different condition to grow art at different place, one should not simplified the way by consider only the mainstream. Art education should not base only the past/ existing system, it evolve with time, it connect to different regions. 

Whether classic art training still relevant? For me, the answer is most definitely.


20151217

Hit The Ground and Blossom

2015



GROUND / SITE-SPECIFIC INSTALLATION
2015 / 0FF-SET INK AND ACRYLIC ON ALUMINIUM PLATE, POLYSTYRENE, STRING / 20 X 20CM X 900 PIECES / SOLO EXHIBITION: HIT THE GROUND AND BLOSSOM / TAKSU GALLERY / 2015

“Ground” is a site-specific installation in the swimming pool of a bungalow-converted art gallery surrounded by tropical garden. I created a floating ground by covering the water surface of entire pool with 900 pieces of 8 inches square aluminium plates, imitating Peranakan tile motif by silk screening on every plate. Every plate is tightened with polyfoam underlying strings. 

It looks similar to water surface from afar but tiled flooring when you come closer. One may observe the wave motions with bright reflections when wind blows. Viewers are encouraged to make contact to the “Ground”. When one of the plates is being pressed, it consequently flows and makes everything shake. 

My work explores the cause behind every effect; focus on cross-cultural tensions. Peranakan culture formed as a result of exchange, when Chinese traders migrated to Malay Archipelago and formed families with local people during 15th-17thcenturies. Peranakan has its unique fusion culture in term of language, cuisines, decorations, etc. It witnessed a harmonious blend between Chinese, Malay and the colonies culture. 


“Ground” signifies an echo from the past, suggesting an ambiguous status to the foundation of my multi-cultural label as a Chinese who was born in a post-colonial multiracial Muslim country. Today Peranakan culture is likely just a tourism icon in Malaysia, with race & religion issues becoming the agendas of politicians, plus the assimilation under industrial globalization, I wonder, would Malaysians still fit into the beautiful multiracial culture facade? The uncertain development of our cultures has me overwhelmed.








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20140710

 2013


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